Walt Disney World Hotel Options for Larger Families

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If you’re a family of four or fewer, you have many options on where to stay during your Walt Disney World vacation. The vast majority of Disney hotel rooms have a capacity of four guests*. But if, like me, you have five or more in your family, then your choices become more limited. Here’s a run-down of your on-site lodging options at Walt Disney World.

Before I get going, let me first clarify by saying that all the WDW hotels allow the stated room capacity plus a child under the age of three sleeping in a Pack ‘n Play crib. For example, the standard value rooms at the Pop Century and All-Star resorts have a stated capacity of four guests, but they do allow five guests to stay in one room if one is a child under age three sleeping in a crib. This means that if your party of five includes a baby, then you can still stay in a single room anywhere at Walt Disney World. (It might not be an ideal fit, but it is legal.)

* Note: There are a handful of rooms at WDW with a stated capacity of just two guests. These include the tower studios at Riviera resort and the outer building garden rooms at BoardWalk Inn, and some king-bed and handicap-accessible rooms at most resorts.

WHERE CAN A FAMILY OF 5+ STAY AT WALT DISNEY WORLD?

Here are your options …

A Deluxe Resort – standard room

Standard room at Disney’s Contemporary resort sleeps five. ©Disney

The standard rooms at most deluxe resorts sleep up to five guests, plus a child under age three in a crib.

  • Describe the room: There are standard rooms at Beach Club, Boardwalk, Contemporary, Grand Floridian, Polynesian, and Yacht Club which have two queen size beds, plus a daybed. These rooms have one bathroom with a double vanity. Please note that the standard rooms at the Wilderness Lodge and Animal Kingdom Lodge are smaller and typically do not include a daybed.
  • Who would be most comfortable there?: The standard-size beds fit two average adults. The deluxe room daybeds are typically sized to fit an adult of moderate height. (I’m 5’6″ and have no problem sleeping on a WDW daybed.) Many women and virtually all pre-teen children would be comfortable on the daybed.
  • Pros of this option: You have access to all the amenities of a deluxe resort, including restaurants, recreation, transportation, and proximity to the theme parks. The rooms are spacious.
  • Cons of this option: Deluxe resorts are more expensive than many of the other options. There is only one bathroom for five people. Other than the bathroom, there is no privacy.

A Murphy bed room at Port Orleans Riverside

Port Orleans Riverside – pull down handle to create child-sized bed

Some, but not all, rooms at Port Orleans Riverside sleep up to five guests, plus a child under age three in a crib.

  • Describe the room: Some rooms at POR are equipped with two queen-sized beds plus one child-sized pull-down bed. These pull-down beds are smaller than a standard twin bed. They pull down from a ledge underneath the TV. These rooms have one bathroom with a double vanity. [Note: many years ago these rooms were outfitted with trundle beds rather than pull-down beds. You may still hear them referred to as trundle rooms.]
  • Who would be most comfortable here?: The sleep surface of the pull-down beds is approximately 66″ x 31″ (for reference, a standard twin bed 75″ x 39″). The pull-down bed is most appropriate for an elementary or preschool age child. Anyone over five feet tall will likely feel cramped. Families of five with young children will have the best experience here.
  • Pros of this option: You have access to the moderate resort amenities, including restaurants, recreation, and transportation. The price point works for many families. You have easy access to the Port Orleans French Quarter (on foot) and to Disney Springs (via boat).
  • Cons of this option: There is only one bathroom for five people. The pull-down bed is directly under the television, making it more than usually disruptive if the parents want to sneak in a movie after the kiddos have fallen asleep. Other than the bathroom, there is no privacy for adults.

A Family Suite at Art of Animation resort

Art of Animation Lion King family suite – outer room

Rooms in three sections of the Art of Animation resort (Nemo, Cars, and Lion King sections) are configured as “family suites.” The stated capacity of a family suite is six guests plus a child under age three sleeping in a crib. [Note: the rooms in the Little Mermaid section of this resort sleep four, not six.]

  • Describe the room: The Art of Animation suites are comprised of two separate rooms with a door between them, two full bathrooms, and a kitchenette in the main room. The inside room includes a queen-size bed. The outside room includes a pull-out sofa that converts to a full-size bed and a table which pulls down to convert to a second full-size bed. The kitchenette includes a dorm-sized refrigerator, a microwave oven, and an extra sink.
  • Who would be most comfortable here: Both the pull-out couch and the pull-down table bed are full-size doubles, which is slightly smaller than a queen-size bed. Two large adults or two unrelated adults (sorority sisters sharing a bed, for example) would likely be uncomfortable on these sleep surfaces. Tweens or younger will probably be fine sharing here. If you have a party of six that includes several mostly smallish children, then Art of Animation is a good option.
  • Pros of this option: There are two full bathrooms, which can greatly reduce the time it takes to get ready in the morning. The kitchenette can help with quick food prep such as making a light breakfast in the room. The separate bedrooms means that two adults can have a private space. The resort is served by a Skyliner station which gives easy access to EPCOT and Hollywood Studios.
  • Cons of this option: There is no on-site table service restaurant at this resort. The rooms are aggressively themed – this is great for many guests, but it may prove bothersome for some guests who are easily overstimulated.

A Family Suite at All-Star Music resort

All-Star Music family suite with both the pull-down beds extended

Some rooms at All-Star Music are configured as “family suites.” The stated capacity of a family suite is six guests plus a child under age three sleeping in a crib. [Note: most rooms at All-Star Music are standard four-person configurations]

  • Describe the room: The All-Star Music family suites are comprised of two rooms with a real door between them, plus two full bathrooms. The inside room includes a queen-sized bed. The outside room includes a pull-down sofa which converts to a double bed, plus a pull-down table which converts to a double bed. There is also a kitchenette area which includes a refrigerator (larger than a dorm fridge, but not quite as large as a standard refrigerator), a microwave oven, coffeemaker and an extra sink.
  • Who would be most comfortable here: Both the pull-down couch and the pull-down table bed are full-size doubles, which is slightly smaller than a queen-size bed. Two large adults or two unrelated adults (sorority sisters sharing a bed, for example) would likely be uncomfortable on these sleep surfaces. Tweens or younger will probably be fine sharing here. If you have a party of six that includes several mostly smallish children, then All-Star Music family suites are a good option.
  • Pros of this option: These rooms tend to be slightly less expensive than the similar family suites at Art of Animation. There are two full bathrooms, which can greatly reduce the time it takes to get ready in the morning. The kitchenette can help with quick food prep such as making a light breakfast in the room. Unlike Art of Animation, the refrigerator has a functioning freezer compartment. The separate bedrooms means that two adults can have a private space.
  • Cons of this option: The bathroom sinks are open to the sleeping areas. There is no on-site table service restaurant. The only transportation to the theme parks is via bus.

Two standard connecting rooms at any Walt Disney World resort

With two rooms together, you’ll be able to sleep eight (at value and moderate) or ten guests (at some deluxe resorts), plus one baby in a crib per room. Connecting rooms have an internal door between them so you don’t have to go out into the hall.

  • Describe the room: This depends on where your stay. Most value and moderate rooms have two queen-sized beds. Most deluxe rooms have two queen beds plus a daybed. However, there are many variations on this. For example, one Christmas I stayed at the Wilderness Lodge. We had a room with two queen-sized beds connected to a room with a queen-sized bed plus two bunk beds. If you have a particular sleep surface configuration in mind, it pays to do a little research to see if your ideal bed configuration exists somewhere on property.
  • Who would be most comfortable here: Guests who want two bathrooms. Guests who would like to have a door between adults/kids, but don’t need a kitchenette or kitchen.
  • Pros of this option: As noted, there are some odd combinations of rooms out there, which may meet the needs of your family. The cost of two standard rooms may be less than the cost of a suite or villa. Connecting rooms exist at all the Walt Disney World resort hotels.
  • Cons of this option: All WDW hotels have some rooms with internal connecting doors. However, while these exist, they are typically not guaranteed. Be absolutely sure that you request connecting rooms in advance and state whether there are solid reasons for your request such as a medical situation or a solo adult traveling with many kids.

A suite at Coronado Springs resort or any of the deluxe resorts

Coronado Springs and all the deluxe resorts have at least a few traditional suite-style rooms. There is a wide variety to the configurations. Some junior honeymoon suites sleep only two, whereas the Presidential Suite at the Contemporary sleeps ten.

  • Describe the room: Too many variations to list.
  • Who would be most comfortable here: Guests looking for a specific experience or sleep surface configuration.
  • Pros of this option: You get an experience that’s just right for your needs. Suites often include concierge service.
  • Cons of this option: Costs are generally high. Some rooms are unique, so availability may be limited.

A one-bedroom villa at some Disney Vacation Club resorts

Saratoga Springs one-bedroom. Child-size pull-down bed extended

Five guests, plus a child under the age of three in a crib can sleep in these option. One-bedroom villas which sleep five can be found at some, but not all Disney Vacation Club resorts.

  • Describe the room: One bedroom villas are comprised of two rooms with a real door between them. The inside room includes a king-sized bed. The outside room has a full kitchen with standard refrigerator, microwave oven, coffeemaker, range, oven, an extra sink, and basic cooking and eating utensils, plus a washer and dryer. The outside room includes a pull-out sofa or a pull-down bed or table which converts to a double bed. The fifth sleep surface is typically a junior-sized Murphy bed that pulls down from the wall underneath the TV, but some have a pull-out ottoman or sleeper chair. At Bay Lake Tower and sometimes at Animal Kingdom Lodge, the five-person one-bedroom villas have two bathrooms, the others have one bathroom.
  • Who would be most comfortable here: Disney Vacation Club members or guests who need a full kitchen.
  • Pros of this option: The villas have deluxe-level amenities. The full kitchen can be a help with quick food prep. The separate bedrooms means extra privacy for the adults.
  • Cons of this option: These rooms are typically much more expensive than the family suites at Art of Animation or All-Star Music. They are also often more expensive than getting two rooms at a value or even a moderate-level resort.

A two- or three-bedroom villa at any Disney Vacation Club resort

These rooms sleep eight or nine guests in a two-bedroom villa, depending on the configuration. Twelve guests fit in a three-bedroom villa, plus a baby in a crib.

  • Describe the room: These are like apartments. Depending on the resort, you’ll find special features like a pool table in some AKL three-bedroom villas or a media room in the Grand Floridian three-bedroom villas. All three-bedroom villas have at least three bathrooms. Two-bedroom villas have either two or three bathrooms. All have full kitchens with a washer/dryer. The master bedrooms feature king-sized beds. Other bedding includes queen-sized beds as well as pull-down beds and/or pull-out chairs.
  • Who would be most comfortable here: Disney Vacation Club members and multi-generational parties where people need privacy and space.
  • Pros of this option: There’s lots of room here, plus easy access to deluxe amenities.
  • Cons of this option: These rooms are quite pricey. There are relatively few of these rooms on property, so availability may be an issue. If you’re housing the full allotment of guests in these rooms, at least two of the guests will be sleeping in the common living room, which may not be ideal for them.

A Fort Wilderness cabin

Fort Wilderness Cabin bedroom

The Fort Wilderness cabins are free-standing buildings with their own dedicated outdoor space. They sleep up to six guests, plus a child under the age of three in a crib.

  • Describe the room: The Fort Wilderness cabins are comprised of two rooms with a real door between them, plus one bathroom. The outside room includes a pull-out couch. The inside room includes a queen-sized bed, plus almost-twin-sized bunk beds. There is also a full kitchen with standard refrigerator, microwave oven, coffeemaker, range, oven, an extra sink, and basic cooking and eating utensils. In addition to the bed, there are tables and chairs. The cabins include a deck with a picnic table, as well as access to the great outdoors.
  • Who would be most comfortable here: People who like the glamping experience.
  • Pros of this option: Unlike most other options in a similar price range, the Fort Wilderness cabins have four sleep surfaces rather than three. This makes it a good option for parties with more unrelated adults or for families with children who have difficulty sleeping in the same bed. The full kitchen can be a help with quick food prep. Outdoor space means that kids can run around close by. Boat access to the Magic Kingdom.
  • Cons of this option: Only one bathroom for six people. Depending your location within Fort Wilderness, you may need to take an internal bus to get to theme park transportation. One side of the queen-sized bed is fully against a wall, making access challenging for the person sleeping on that side of the bed.

A Treehouse at Disney’s Saratoga Springs resort

Saratoga Treehouse Villa – exterior

The Saratoga Springs treehouses are free-standing buildings with their own dedicated outdoor space. They sleep up to nine guests, plus a child under the age of three in a crib.

  • Describe the room: Like the Fort Wilderness cabins, the treehouses are completely separate buildings, not rooms inside a hotel. The treehouses are comprised of four rooms with real doors between them, plus two bathrooms. The master bedroom includes a king sized bed. The second bedroom includes a queen-sized bed. The third bedroom includes twin bunk beds. The living room includes a pull-out couch that converts to a double bed, plus a chair that converts to a twin bed. There is also a full kitchen with standard refrigerator, microwave oven, coffeemaker, range, oven, an extra sink, basic cooking and eating utensils, and a washer/dryer. The treehouse includes a deck with a table, as well as access to the great outdoors.
  • Who would be most comfortable here: Multi-generational parties.
  • Pros of this option: There’s lots of privacy, both inside the unit as well as with the outdoor space.
  • Cons of this option: You’re fairly far away from the amenities at the main Saratoga Springs resort. Treehouse guests will have a much improved experience by renting a car. Treehouses may be pricey and availability can be limited.

A bungalow at Disney’s Polynesian Village resort

Polynesian bungalow – soaking pool with Bay Lake in the background

The Polynesian bungalows are free-standing buildings, each with a dedicated soaking pool on a deck area. The bungalows are directly on the water of Bay Lake, with unparalleled views of Magic Kingdom. They sleep up to 8 guests, plus a child under age three in a crib.

  • Describe the room: There are two rooms with real doors. The main bedroom has a king-sized bed. The second bedroom has a queen-sized bed plus a child-size pull-down bed. The living room includes a child-size pull-down bed and a pull-out sofa. There are also two full bathrooms and a full kitchen.
  • Who would be most comfortable here: DVC members with points to burn.
  • Pros of this option: The views are INCREDIBLE.
  • Cons of this option: Some guests may be bothered by noise of the ferry horn. These are among the most expensive accommodations at Disney World – $$$$$$.

A cabin at Disney’s Wilderness Lodge resort

Wilderness Lodge Copper Creek Cabin – living room

The Copper Creek cabins at Wilderness Lodge are free-standing buildings with screened porches featuring a hot tub. They sleep up to 8 guests, plus a child under age three in a crib.

  • Describe the room: There are two rooms with real doors. The main bedroom has king-sized bed. The second bedroom has a queen-sized bed plus a child-sized pull-down bed. The living room includes a pull-out sofa and a pull-out chair. There are also two full bathrooms and a full kitchen.
  • Who would be most comfortable here: DVC members who prefer the North Woods to Polynesia.
  • Pros of this option: Well, they’re not quite as expensive as the Poly bungalows. They feel particularly cozy during the winter.
  • Cons of this option: Still VERY expensive.

And of course, it’s possible that none of these options is exactly right for your family, or that these options are not at price points that make sense for you. In that case, there may be off-site accommodation options that may make more sense for you.

When looking at the Disney lodging situation, my family of five decided that joining the Disney Vacation Club best met our needs. We typically use our DVC points to stay in one or two bedroom villas. But there are times when we’re out of points or find no villa availability for a spontaneous trip. In this situation, we usually get two connecting rooms.

Do you have a family of five or more? What is your preferred lodging situation at Walt Disney World? Do the cabins or family suites work for you? What about the villas? Or have you decided that off-site accommodations better meet your needs? Let us know in the comments below.

Erin Foster

Erin Foster is an original member of the Walt Disney World Moms Panel at DisneyWorldMoms.com, a regular contributor to TouringPlans.com, and co-author of The Unofficial Guide to Disney Cruise Line. She's been to WDW, DL, DL Paris, Hong Kong Disneyland, Aulani, DVC Vero Beach, and DVC Hilton Head. She's a Platinum DCL cruiser and veteran of 10 Adventures by Disney trips. Erin lives near New York City, where she can often be found indulging in her other obsession - Broadway theater. Erin can be reached on Twitter @MsErinFoster.

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