Liberty Square re-creates Colonial America at the time of the Revolutionary War. The architecture is Federal or Colonial, and provides a seamless transition from the edge of Fantasyland to Frontierland. A real, 130-year-old live oak, the Liberty Tree, lends dignity and grace to the setting.

Related blogs:
The Disney's in the Details: Liberty Square
15 Iconic Photos You Must Take at WDW - Liberty Square Pillory

Attractions

Despite being one of the smallest "lands" in any Disney park, Liberty Square requires an unusual level of detail because it reflects the qualities of places that really exist and would be accessible to many of Disney World's visitors. The challenge for the design team was to create, in the Imagineers's words, an "enhanced reality" that is "better than real".

Just like Frontierland, the use of architectural details provides the clues for our trip through time and geography. For Liberty Square, our trip begins in New York along the banks of the Hudson River in the early 1700s, where the Haunted Mansion is based on the gothic architecture used in the New York region when it was known as Dutch New Amsterdam.

The nearby Columbia Harbor House would feel right at home in the port city of Boston in the mid-1700s. Traveling south, the buildings begin to take on the Georgian style popular in Williamsburg during the late 1700s. The Hall of Presidents is modeled after buildings in Philadelphia at the time of the Constitution's adoption in 1787. Liberty Square ends at the edge of the American frontier with the Diamond Horseshoe Saloon, which could have been in St. Louis during the 1830s. The westward expansion continues in Frontierland.

Dining