Description And Comments

Innoventions, a huge, busy collection of hands-on walk-through exhibits sponsored by corporations, consists of two huge, crescent-shaped, glass-walled structures (Innoventions East and Innoventions West) separated by a central plaza. Dynamic, interactive, and forward-looking, the area resembles a high-tech trade show. Electronics and entertainment technology exhibits play a prominent role, as do ecology and "how things work" displays.

Each major exhibit is sponsored by a different manufacturer or research lab and most emphasize the effect of the product(s) or technology on daily living. Exhibits change periodically, and there's a definite trend toward larger, more elaborate affairs - almost mini-attractions. The newer exhibits are more compelling, but they require waiting in line to be admitted. For example, a current exhibit on saving for retirement includes a short game-show-type activity complete with a computerized piggy bank you carry around. Other hands-on interactive exhibits cover recycling and protecting your home from severe weather. severe weather.

Our favorite new attraction is Raytheon's Sum of all Thrills, a roller-coaster simulator in which you design the coaster track on a computer, then climb aboard a giant robotic arm to experience your creation. We're so impressed, we've given it its own attraction review and added a step devoted to it in our Epcot Touring Plans.

A father of three from Tulsa, Oklahoma, liked Innoventions:

The best things at Epcot for my kids were the hands-on exhibits at Innoventions. We bumped into the computer games there as we were passing through en route to something else (I don't remember what, because we never got there).

Touring Tips

Spend time at Innoventions on your second day at Epcot. If you have only one day, visit late if you have the time and endurance. (The one exception to this is Sum of All Thrills, which you should visit in the morning after Soarin', Test Track, and Mission: SPACE).

Although many of these productions are worthwhile, the guest capacity of each theater is so small that long lines form. A couple of exhibits, such as Where's the Fire? -- an interactive program about fire safety -- are worth 15 minutes of waiting in line, but they're the exception. We suggest skipping exhibits with waits of more than 10 minutes or experiencing them first thing in the morning on your second day, when there are no lines.

Special Comments

Most exhibits demand time and participation to be rewarding-there's not much gained here by a quick walk-through.

Special Needs

Other Attractions in Future World

Touring Plans with Innoventions East

What is a Touring Plan?